• Hibiscus Petals For Health, Henna Color Enhancement & Hair Conditioning

    Posted on October 15, 2010 by in DIY, Hair, Health & Wellness

    I recently purchased hibiscus petal powder to add to my henna treatments for a black cherry tint.  It created a beautiful color with my henna.  I’ve been using henna to strengthen my hair and promote healthy hair growth.  My hair is much softer, more manageable, and sheds less.  Read more about henna in my article Henna Beautiful Hair.

    Hibiscus flower petals have some wonderful alternate uses as well.

    1. Hair Rinse

    Hibiscus petals promote healthy hair growth, prevent hair fall and dandruff, and slow down premature graying.  It also adds shine and luster to hair as it is a wonderful hair conditioner.

    What you will need:

    Hibiscus Petals

    Water

    Brew the flowers as you would to make a tea.  Allow to cool before straining and use as a hair rinse after your final rinse out conditioner.

    2. Healing Tea

    Hibiscus flower tea has been used for centuries in Africa, Asia, North Africa and the Caribbean for its healing properties.  It is a common ingredient in many tea blends.   Hibiscus flowers are rich in vitamin C and antioxidants.

    Hibiscus flower tea is known to lower blood pressure, fever, and for the treatment of liver problems.  It is also used as a tea to soothe stomach and digestive problems and for its calming effects on the nerves.  You can buy hibiscus flower tea in a herbal tea blend or create  your own with hibiscus whole flowers or hibiscus petals.

    3. Herbal Infused Oil

    Infuse your favorite carrier oil with dried hibiscus flowers to create a hot oil treatment for your hair or to even protect the ends of your hair as a leave-in treatment.  Infuse hibiscus flowers with jojoba or grapeseed oil if you have normal to oily hair.  For normal to dry hair try almond or olive oil.  Read about how to infuse oils in my article DIY Herbal Oil Infusions.  I love adding amla to my herbal oil infusion for my hair.  Amla is also a wonderful herb for hair health.  To learn more about amla check out Amla–Ayurvedic Herb for Health and Beauty.

    (Image by layoutsparks.com)

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12 Responses so far.

  1. Mika says:

    I’ve heard that hibiscus can be used to wash hair. Have you tried it?

  2. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Mika,
    I haven’t used hibiscus to cleanse my hair but here are some other no poo hair methods that I have tried.
    DIY Herbal Infused Apple Cider Vinegar
    Soapwort Root–A Natural Cleanser
    Rhassoul Clay For Shampoo
    DIY Herbal Hair Rinse
    DIY Green Tea Cleansing Hair Rinse
    I’ve also used conditioners to wash my hair and scalp which I mention here. Hope this helps and have a beautiful day!

  3. Karolina says:

    Dear Dawn Michelle,
    I have read that hibiscus tea can stain, is this true? As I have blonde hair this would be undesirable. Do you have any idea if the oil infusion results in color changes as well? Thanks :)

  4. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Karolina,
    Hibiscus petals enhance the redness in henna. As a blond you may want to try dried catnip, calendula, and chamomile for conditioning and enhancing blond hair.
    Have a beautiful day,
    Dawn Michelle

  5. scribbler says:

    can it be used in place of conditioner?

  6. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Scribbler, I don’t use hibiscus powder as my only conditioner because I have extremely dry hair. Dried hibiscus makes a good herbal tea rinse and I do love it with my henna treatments. If you want to try an herb in place of conditioner catnip herbal tea rinses were praised on the Long Hair Community Forum. When I tried it myself I did enjoy it yet still needed another conditioner for my extremely dry hair. Hope that helps some!

  7. Mary says:

    Good morning!
    I was at my grocery yesterday when I ran across a bag of dried hibiscus flowers. I have been doing herb and floral oil infusions for my skin care routine for a few years now (no soap at all and my skin looks great!) anyways, this morning I decided to look up using hibiscus for skin and hair care and stumbled across your site. I’m thinking I will try it as a hair treatment. My hair is naturally a bright copper red so I think any color will only enhance that. :)

  8. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Mary,
    Hibiscus is great for conditioning hair. Also the natural color of your hair sounds so beautiful. Enjoy your day and let me know how it turns out!

  9. Tracey says:

    Hello:)

    I have learned so much and developed my own regimens from your website in the past year, thank you! And now, I am ready to change up some of my recipes. Therefore, I am looking at hibiscus as an option, but am unsure how to fit it in. I too have dry hair (African-American, natural, curly, not very course) so would it be beneficial if I only used hibiscus along with alma or do you think I might need another conditioner?
    My plan would probably be to steep amla whole and hibiscus herb, then strain and blend with the powdered amla and hibiscus, making a condition mask. I don’t know…what do you think? See my goal is to nurture and enhance my curls and shine as I regrow my hair (recently cut it all off just for a new summer look) that is why I was only going to use amla (because I know it’s great for curls) but figured maybe I can add something else for a boost. Is there a better way to fit it in as a conditioner?

    Thanks in advance!

  10. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Tracey,
    Your conditioning mask sounds good. You may find that you even enjoy using the amla and hibiscus tea as a conditioning spray. It really is all about trial and error and finding what you love and what works for you. Best wishes!

  11. Tracey says:

    Hello again..lol,

    Thank you for your response, but while considering the hibiscus I began to dig a little deeper into the best herbs for dry hair (which were all new to me) and quite interesting! You have really taught me how to approach this whole herbal hair care world. So with that being said, I am now on a quest to concoct the best moisturizing rinse I can! But I need your advice.
    I am going to combine marshmallow root, burdock root, and slippery elm bark (oh and of course my amla whole for curl) to create a rinse; so, I can then mix it with the amla powder for a 45 min. mask. (Although whatever rinse is left over would still be used as a leave-in throughout the week). The desired effect is to win the war against my dry hair, and have the softest shiniest curls ever.
    So here is my question: Do you think the first three herbs are sufficient or would adding elder flowers make this concoction even better? I ask because I feel like the amla powder is going to take away some of the mucilage power (if that makes any sense..sorry still learning). I know those three are really good for dryness and not sure if elder flower would make a difference. I just did not want to over do it or under do it. Then I wouldn’t be a Minimalist!
    Thanks again in advance:)

  12. Dawn Michelle says:

    Hi Tracey,
    It really is about trial and error and finding what works best for you. I have found that the most important things is what you cleanse your hair with. Maybe this article and series will be helpful to you. Best wishes!